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can i change my mortgage rate without a refinance?

would this be done through a loan modification by tRanger78642218 from Salem, Oregon. Mar 4th 2015 Reply


Dave Metsker (DaveMetsker)
#37 ranked lender in Oregon - 2,317 contributions

Loan modification is your only option.

Mar 4th 2015
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William J Acres (William_Acres)
#1 ranked lender in Arizona - 8,683 contributions

The only way to change your interest rate would be to refinance.. you can do a loan modification, but this is only for folks suffering from a hardship.. there are very strict guidelines and documentation required to prove your hardship, and even if your approved for a loan mod, it's unlikely you would be happy with the results.. in fact less than 5% of successful loan modifications result with a satisfied borrower, so the odds are against you.. I'm a Broker here in Scottsdale AZ and I only lend in Arizona. If you or someone you know is looking for financing options, feel free to contact me or pass along my information. William J. Acres, Lender411's number ONE lender in Arizona. 480-287-5714 WilliamAcres.com

Mar 4th 2015
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Chris Barry (TheLoanDoctor)
#45 ranked lender in Oregon - 41 contributions

It really depends on what it is you're trying to accomplish.Give me a call and we can discuss your situation thoroughly.503-515-2309

Mar 4th 2015
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Jericho Cherry (Jerichocherry)
#56 ranked lender in Virginia - 1,107 contributions

The simple answer is no, unless your mortgage company is willing to do a loan modification.

Mar 5th 2015
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Joe Metzler (JoeMetzler)
#1 ranked lender in Minnesota - 3,908 contributions

The quick answer is NO. The long answer is that it is only possible by asking your current lender to modify your loan under the HAMP program. They will only do that after a you prove and document sever financial hardship, and that you are likely to fail on the loan. Usually you must be already behind on your loan. Generally speaking, even if that were to happen, it is usually just a short-term reduction in rate for a few years, not a permanent one.

Mar 5th 2015
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