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my credit score is poor would I still be able to get a first time home owner loan so I can get my first home

by tffny_conner914 from Sterling Heights, Michigan. Mar 27th 2014 Reply


Mike Silkworth (msilkw_195_870)
#30 ranked lender in Michigan - 527 contributions

You will need to get your score up first. Most loans will require a 620 or more likely a 640. Talking to a Lender now to get the best advise on how to raise your score is the best idea.

Mar 27th 2014
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Jason Vondrak (jvondrak)
#219 ranked lender in California - 1,741 contributions

Your credit score is important in helping you get the best interest rate possible. What is it currently? With an FHA loan some lenders will go as low as 500, however many require at least 640 or higher. I would suggest working to boost your credit score prior to applying for a home loan.

Mar 27th 2014
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David Drakeford (david_drakeford)
#0 ranked lender in California - 63 contributions

If you have a 500 score you can get an FHA loan with 10% down. With a 580 you would need 3.5% down. Give us a call to let us know your specific scenario, we'd love to help. 800-446-9043 ext 801

Mar 27th 2014
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Sean Young (SeanYoung)
#2 ranked lender in Colorado - 1,112 contributions

It depends on how low your middle credit score is and in addition they will look at your total credit picture and will depend on if you have recent 30 day or greater late payments, collection, charge offs etc. You can go down to 580 with 3.5% and anything below 580 you will need 10% down with FHA. But again, it will depend on your total credit picture. I would reach out to a local loan officer and have them review your credit with you and they will be able to let you know if you qualify now or what you will need to do to qualify in the near future. Best wishes, Sean

Mar 27th 2014
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William J Acres (William_Acres)
#1 ranked lender in Arizona - 8,683 contributions

It really depends on what your credit profile is.. saying it's "Poor" doesn't really help.. But just so you understand.. it' will be hard for a lender to lend you money to purchase a home knowing that you have paid every debt or obligation you have either late or not at all.. so having very bad credit will never allow to purchase a home.. The thinking is this.. If you cant pay your credit card bill on time, why should they believe you can pay a mortgage on time? He who is faithful with little, will be faithful with much.. All this being said... without knowing exactly what is on your credit, it's impossible for any one here to say for sure.. we need to look at your complete loan scenario to advise you correctly.. for this reason, I suggest that you contact a LOCAL mortgage broker and apply with them. Do not use the local "Big" bank, or one of those 50 states internet lenders or nationwide lenders...By applying with your LOCAL Broker, you have an advantage because he's familiar with local customs and works with numerous lenders, seeking out the best loan terms for your particular scenario. Because he has lower overhead, he can offer you lower rates and lower fees than most of the larger lenders.. I'm a Broker here in Scottsdale AZ and I only lend in Arizona. If you or someone you know is looking for financing options, feel free to contact me or pass along my information. William J. Acres, Lender411's number ONE lender in Arizona. 480-287-5714 WilliamAcres.com

Mar 27th 2014
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Carri Goldring (CarriGoldring)
#38 ranked lender in Michigan - 10 contributions

I agree. The credit score is important but the loan program is too. Best to spend 10 minutes on the phone with you getting your information so I can direct and councel you as to what you should do to get ready to purchase a home. 800-372-2205 - cgoldring@thefsb.com

Mar 27th 2014
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Casey Hansen (CaseyHansen)
#2 ranked lender in Pennsylvania - 135 contributions

Most lenders will require 620 or 640 minimum. It may be possible to find a lender that will go lower, but it may make more sense to address the underlying reason for the low credit score first. If you have open collections, past due accounts, charge offs, etc. I would say address those before buying a home. I've seen borrowers increase their scores dramatically in just a few months by taking the right steps.

Mar 27th 2014
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